Dogwood quilt – tutorial

I have been asked about how to make this quilt, Dogwood quite few times so I decide to write a free tutorial. I am happy to share it but if you are making one, it would be nice to put a credit on it and if you want to share this tutorial, please link/refer to this site.

dogwood-01

 

I am going to skip the basic of how to make log cabin blocks. If you are not sure, ask anywhere quilt related, on the web, book or person. It’s not a difficult block to make. Just cut right and sew in a right order.

My blocks are quite small and you may use foundation paper piecing method to make this but if you can keep 1/4″ seam allowance accurate, it will be much quicker to make it.

 

Now,

You need to make eight of each of two blocks below. Ones mainly blue and ones mainly white. They are exactly same blocks, just the placement of colours are flipped around. I used various blue and white fabric to add more interest. Blocks should be 7 1/4″ by 7 1/4″ unfinished.

blue block curved log cabin

Blue block

white block curved log cabin.

White block

 

 

Cutting Instruction.

Because they are small, you may need to cut them more carefully than usual. All cuttin size are including seam allowance, 1/4″.

For blue fabric of Blue block or white fabric of  White block,  cut fabric to 1 1/2″ wide strips and cut them as

② 1 1/4″, ③ 2 1/4″, ⑥ 2 3/4″, ⑦ 3 3/4″ , ⑩ 4 1/4″, ⑪ 5 1/4″, ⑭ 5 3/4″, ⑮ 6 3/4″

For white fabric of Blue block or blue fabric of  White block,  cut fabric to 1″ wide strips and cut them as

④ 2 1/4″, ⑤ 2 3/4″, ⑧ 3 3/4″, ⑨ 4 1/4″, ⑫ 5 1/4″, ⑬ 5 3/4″, ⑯ 6 3/4″, ⑰ 7 1/4″

For the fabric , cut as 1 1/4″ by 1 1/4″.

NOTE: I know some people sew and cut to size to make log cabin blocks but I oppose to it. Because fabric can stretch and shrink back to make warps and sometimes end ups any size. If you want to be more accurate, do cut fabric to the size first and sew to fit them together. That way you have some space to adjust as you go as well.

Piece them together in log cabin manner, starting from ①+②.

 

Block Assembly

Stitch together one blue block and one white block as below. Make eight pairs.

two blocks.jpg

Stitch together two of above together. Make four blocks as below.

four blocks

Finally, sew together four blocks and you have one dogwood flower. It is 27 1/2″ by 27 1/2″ unfinished.

eight blocks

I probably added 1″ wide skinny white border and 3″ green border but not quite sure and since I don’t have this quilt anymore I can’t tell you exactly.

Is it too small? Of course you can enlarge it. Cut one side 2 1/2″ wide strips and other 1 1/2″ wide. the centre fabric ① should be 2 1/2″ by 2 1/2″ and I let you do the rest of the math!

Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any questions.

 

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2 thoughts on “Dogwood quilt – tutorial

  1. Log cabin blocks have so many more possibilities than when I first made them so long ago. I hope many will enjoy your tutorial and not only give you credit, but thanks as well.

  2. I remember seeing this pattern in one of my quilt magazines about 20 +/- years ago. I believe it may have been an ad for a book of paper pieced curved log cabins, but I just figured out the pattern ratios from the 2 or 3 inch square photo.
    I also don’t have the one I made although I have one or a few paper piece templates, but I didn’t label where it came from. Do you remember when and where you came across it? I have searched not quite all the 100 or so quilt magazines to find it yet….so if you know I’d appreciate it. Or if you just figured it out on your own, that’s fine, too. Thanks for sharing online.

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